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ETO Record Number
173
Author
VanCleave, Janice Pratt
Title
Energy for every kid
Secondary Title (usually periodical title)
Volume (periodical)
Number (periodical)
Accession Number (For ERIC and similar collections)
Call Number
QC73.4 .V36 2006
531/.6 22
Edition
Editor
ISBN
047133099X
Format
Keywords
Force and energy--Juvenile literature.
Power resources--Juvenile literature.
Pages
xi, 221 p.
Location Published
Hoboken, NJ
Publisher
J. Wiley & Sons
Date of Publication
2006
Related URLs (sometimes the Library of Congress record)

Abstract
Notes
Publisher's description: How do plants make their own food? Why do the different strings on a guitar have different sounds? What does the color of a star tell you about how hot the star is? What's the difference between gamma rays, X-rays, and microwaves? Now you can discover the answers to these and many other fascinating questions about energy for yourself with this fun-filled science resource. Packed with illustrations, Janice VanCleave's Energy for Every Kid presents entertaining, challenging experiments and activities to help you understand the different types of energy-including heat, sound, electricity, and light-and how they bring about change in the world around you. You'll develop your problem-solving skills as you create a "leaping frog" that turns potential energy into kinetic energy, model sound waves with a Slinky®, use a balloon to demonstrate static electricity, make "sun" tea with solar energy, and much more! Each of the activities is broken down into its purpose, a list of materials, step-by-step instructions, expected results, and an easy-to-understand explanation. Plus, all projects have been pretested so you can perform them safely and inexpensively in the classroom, at a science fair, or at home!